NEW YORK, New York – February 12, 2014 – (HISPANICIZE WIRE) – There were songbirds. There were actresses and even a few kick-ass females — literally — that kept us hitting “refresh” on our browsers in 2013. Since the year had so many stunning Latinas we canvassed pop culture for the most hypnotic women we could find. Some are newcomers that made an impact upon arrival; others are familiar faces who raised their game to the next level. Then there are the household names that just kept getting bigger.

‘LLERO began this tradition in 2012 with its first honorees which ran the gamut, from rookies such as television commentator Melanie Iglesias who seemed to arrive out of virtual obscurity, to familiar faces such as Jordana Brewster and Denise Vasi that had breakout years, to established veterans such as Eva Longoria and Jennifer Lopez who reached new heights.

In 2013 ‘LLERO continued this tradition. This year’s recipients include recording artist and actress, Selena Gomez, World Wrestling Entertainment Divas, The Bella Twins; the first Latina Playmate of the Year, Raquel Pomplun; actress, comedienne and television producer Sofia Vergara, and indie film phenoms Aubrey Plaza and Melonie Diaz.

To view the entire list of the 2013 Hot Latinas of the Year go to http://www.llero.net/2013/latinas or visit us at http://www.llero.net.

About ‘LLERO
‘LLERO [pronounced: yeh-ro] is an English language, digital magazine for the Latino man. We deliver news, knowledge and advice to Latino men who have their feet firmly planted in both Latino and American cultures. ‘LLERO speaks directly to Latino men’s interests in women, career, culture, style, entertainment and health.

Created in 2011 ‘LLERO is the brainchild of three Latino siblings who were tired of watered-down media created for Latinos. Rather than let someone else interpret their culture, they decided to create a space that reflects the way Latino men act, talk and live.

So what does “‘LLERO” mean exactly? In Spanish the word “caballero” means “gentleman.” Caballero, often used by an older generation, felt a bit too stuffy by today’s standards. In certain Latino circles a gentleman can more casually be called a ‘LLERO. This word felt like a natural fit for this audience — Latino men growing into tomorrows’ refined gentlemen.